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Biological Interventions in Psychoses of Childhood

  • Magda Campbell

Abstract

An up-to-date review of biological interventions in psychoses of childhood is presented here, together with occasional comments on efficacy based on the author’s experience. After brief mention of earlier forms of biological-organic treatment (psychosurgery, insulin, and electroconvulsive therapies), the review focuses on drug therapy. Relative prominence is given to major tranquilizers, lithium, and the hormones. Suitable information is also presented on hypnotics, anticonvulsants, sedatives, stimulants, antidepressant drugs, minor tranquilizers, hallucinogens, L-dopa, and vitamins. It is suggested that no specific drug is available for the treatment of any diagnostic category. Currently available drugs are most effective in reducing such symptoms as insomnia, hyperactivity, impulsivity, irritability, disorganized behavior, psychotic thought disorder, and certain types of aggressivity. The need for uniformity in the classification of child psychoses is stressed in light of its potential value in predicting responses of children to specific drugs.

Keywords

Biological Intervention Autistic Child Child Psychiatry Current Therapeutic Research Retarded Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Magda Campbell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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