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Coping Behavior and Neurochemical Changes

An Alternative Explanation for the Original “Learned Helplessness” Experiments
  • J. M. Weiss
  • H. I. Glazer
  • L. A. Pohorecky

Abstract

For several years, we have been investigating the question of how psychological variables in stress situations affect physiological responses. This is shown diagrammatically in Figure 1 as the influence of (A) on (B). It is of particular relevance for mental/behavioral disorders if such investigations can be carried a step further, which is to determine whether the differential physiological changes (B) that arise because of psychological variables in stress situations (A) can in turn mediate subsequent behavioral changes (C). In this event, we shall be able to observe how significant psychological factors lead to behavioral change via physiological mediation that is known to us.

Keywords

Inescapable Shock Neurochemical Change Noradrenergic Activity Brain Norepinephrine Escape Deficit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Weiss
    • 1
  • H. I. Glazer
    • 1
  • L. A. Pohorecky
    • 1
  1. 1.The Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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