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HF and CO2 Laser Measurements of Dispersion of the Nonlinear Susceptibility in Zinc-Blende Crystals

  • J. A. Weiss
Part of the Optical Physics and Engineering book series (OPEG)

Abstract

Measurements have been made of the nonlinear susceptibility for second harmonic generation (x(2)) of several zinc-blende crystals using pulsed HF and CO2 transverse-excitation lasers. This study was undertaken to determine the existence of dispersion in X(2) in regions of crystal transparency. Previous measurements of dispersion in X(2) have been restricted to absorbing regions because of a lack of suitable laser sources in the infrared. Analysis of the experimental data indicates increases in the magnitude of x(2)from 10.2 μm to 2.87 μm which greatly exceed those predicted by theoretical calculations of the dispersion of the nonlinear susceptibility in crystals with this structure. Single crystals of GaAs, CdTe and ZnTe were used in this experiment with the ZnTe crystal being used as a reference sample. Increases in X(2) on the order of 140% for GaAs and 70% for CdTe have been measured.

Keywords

Second Harmonic Generation Nonlinear Crystal Physical Review Letter Nonlinear Susceptibility Fundamental Beam 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Weiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Naval Research LaboratoryUSA

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