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Lyotropic Liquid Crystals and Biological Membranes: The Crucial Role of Water

  • Peter J. Wojtowicz

Abstract

No collection of papers on liquid crystals would be complete without some discussion of lyotropic liquid crystals and biological membranes. At the present time these two subjects constitute areas of intensive research effort providing a literature of rapidly increasing size. The high current interest mandates a discussion of these topics, but at the same time makes it very difficult to select the material to be presented in the limited space available. The discussion in this chapter will therefore be confined to two main topics, (1) the composition and structure of lyotropic liquid crystals and biological membranes and (2) the nature of the principal interactions that give rise to their existence and stability.

Keywords

Liquid Crystal Biological Membrane Hydrophobic Effect Hydrophilic Interaction Amphiphilic Molecule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© RCA Laboratories 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Wojtowicz
    • 1
  1. 1.RCA LaboratoriesPrincetonUSA

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