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Man in the Ocean Environment: Psychophysiological Factors

  • Charles W. Shilling
  • Margaret F. Werts
  • Nancy R. Schandelmeier

Abstract

Besides providing man a wide range of information about his environment, the visual sense provides confirmatory data for information received through the other senses. In an underwater environment certain changes take place in the visual process due to the change of the visual medium from air to water. Understanding these changes is relevant to the effective engineering of underwater tools and equipment and the orientation of the underwater worker who must perform in a strange environment.

Keywords

Hearing Loss Motion Sickness Round Window Ocean Environment Otitis Externa 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles W. Shilling
    • 1
  • Margaret F. Werts
    • 1
  • Nancy R. Schandelmeier
    • 1
  1. 1.Science Communication Division, Department of Medical and Public Affairs The Medical CenterThe George Washington UniversityUSA

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