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Underwater Communications

  • Charles W. Shilling
  • Margaret F. Werts
  • Nancy R. Schandelmeier

Abstract

A reliable communication capability is necessary in all but a few underwater operations in order to have efficient team coordination and to provide a prime safety factor for the diver. To solve the problems of underwater speech communications, a total systems approach is needed. In the past, the simplest and most dependable methods were tugs on a tether rope or hand signals (see Table X-1 and Figures X-1 and X-2). These standardized-through-use signals are still used by scuba divers and, as a backup system, by professional divers working for science, the military, or industry. However, for today’s sophisticated underwater operations, an efficient, highly sensitive, hopefully simple, reliable, and flexible voice communication system is necessary. Such a system should be able to transmit the common language code without the diver having to learn any other.

Keywords

Vocal Tract Speech Sound Speech Intelligibility Normal Speech Intelligibility Score 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles W. Shilling
    • 1
  • Margaret F. Werts
    • 1
  • Nancy R. Schandelmeier
    • 1
  1. 1.Science Communication Division, Department of Medical and Public Affairs The Medical CenterThe George Washington UniversityUSA

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