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The Constructive Use of Ignorance

  • Hilde Bruch

Abstract

Dr. Anthony’s suggestion to “introspect on the way your research mind is fashioned and the strategies that it habitually uses to solve problems” sounded to me like an invitation for True Confessions about myself. My first confession is that serendipity has played a great role in my life, that things just happened and I made use of them with little conscious planning. I doubt that I would have pursued a professional career, or would even have known about such a possibility for a girl, if the winter of 1917 had not been so very cold and the German school system so conscientious. Instead of being allowed to freeze in unheated classrooms or stay at home, we were taken to a large lake where students from various schools of the whole district went ice skating. There I noticed some girls with red students’ caps, and from them I learned about a school in a nearby larger city where girls could learn Latin and mathematics, obtain the “Abiturium,” and go on to the university. This was in February—and six weeks later I was enrolled in this school, which corresponded to the Realgymnasium for boys.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Obese Child Congenital Hypothyroidism Erroneous Assumption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hilde Bruch
    • 1
  1. 1.Baylor College of MedicineTexas Medical CenterHoustonUSA

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