The Coacervate-In-Coacervate Theory of the Origin of Life

  • Vladimír J. A. Novák

Abstract

The chief merit of Oparin’s coacervate theory of the origin of life on the Earth was that it opened to modern science a field of research which up to then had been a subject of mere speculation. This was even more the case after the theory had been enriched by new experimental findings on the chemical synthesis of more complicated organic matter, including protein-like substances and nucleotides, in line with the constructionist approach (see Fox, 9). Many prominent biologists and biochemists and Oparin (22,23, etc.) himself developed this concept further and supported it by new findings and arguments of principal importance, e.g. Calvin (4), Fox and Dose (8), Bernal (2), Ponnamperuma (25), Buvet (3), Florkin (7), Dose (5), Lipmann (15), Krasnovsky (14), Eigen (6), and Oró (24).

Keywords

Influenza Polypeptide Expense Lism Culmination 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimír J. A. Novák
    • 1
  1. 1.Czechoslovak Academy of SciencesPragueCzechoslovakia

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