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Ion Implantation in Silver Bromide

  • T. M. Kelly
  • J. E. Keevert
  • J. O. Helling
  • J. A. Merrigan
Part of the The IBM Research Symposia Series book series (IRSS)

Abstract

We have implanted thin layers of silver bromide microcrystals with 1011 to 1014 silver, xenon, phosphorus, and cadmium ions per cm2, at energies from 30 to 225 keV, and used the intrinsic photosensitivity of the crystals to determine the effects of the implantation. Because of the unique properties of AgBr, which allow latent image formation by light and amplification of the image by chemical development, the effects of impurity ions on photocarrier trapping can be detected readily. Prior to implantation the microcrystals formed latent image only on the surface upon exposure to light. The spontaneous developability caused by ion bonibardment was removed by a bromination process. After implantation, bromination, and light exposure, the AgBr microcrystals showed reduced surface sensitivity and significant internal latent image for all of the ions studied. Evidently the implantation-induced defects controlled the photocarrier trapping. Proper annealing conditions for the elimination of the radiation damage caused by the high-energy ions were foxmd from the silver-implanted samples. After annealing, both cadmiuam and phosphorus controlled the photoelectron trapping and increased the internal photosensitivity of the microcrystals.

Keywords

Latent Image Sodium Sulfite Silver Halide Relative Exposure Silver Bromide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    For a discussion of the physics of the photographic process see “The Physics of Solids,” F. C. Brown, Benjamin, New York, 1967, Ch. 12.Google Scholar
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    H. E. Spencer and R. E. Atwell, J Opt. Soc. Amer., 54, 498, (1964) Note: The temperature was and the 60°C and 8.1, giving cubic instead of spherical grains, with no intentional chemical sensitization.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Similar to Kodak SWR (short-wave radiation) film described in Kodak Publication No. P-9, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, I967.Google Scholar
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    Richard Cheevers, private communication. Ion Physics Corporation, Burlington, Massachusetts, April 1970.Google Scholar
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    T. H. James, W. Vanselow and R. P. Quirk, PSA Journal, Photogr. Sci. Tech., 19B, 170 (1953)Google Scholar
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    T. H. James, Photogr. Sci. Eng., 7, 304 (1963)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. M. Kelly
    • 1
  • J. E. Keevert
    • 1
  • J. O. Helling
    • 1
  • J. A. Merrigan
    • 1
  1. 1.Research LaboratoriesEastman Kodak CompanyRochesterUSA

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