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Chemical Transfer of Learned Information in Mammals and Fish

  • Ejnar J. Fjerdingstad

Abstract

The phenomenon of “chemical transfer of learned information” was investigated in rodents and goldfish, using a variety of behavioral and biochemical approaches. Operant and classical conditioning, and positive and negative reinforcement were all found to give transfer effects. In discriminative situations indication for behavioral specificity of the effect was found. Brain homogenates, crude supernatants, and partly purified RNA extracts were equally effective. The site of injection was unimportant except for influencing the necessary amounts of brain material. This would seem to indicate that transfer effects are statistically reliable, occur commonly in many different types of learning, and are specific to the type of training applied to donors.

Keywords

Transfer Effect Audiogenic Seizure Memory Transfer Chemical Transfer Learn Information 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ejnar J. Fjerdingstad
    • 1
  1. 1.Anatomy Department BUniversity of AarhusDenmark

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