Non-Coherent Bundles — Manufacture and Properties

  • W. B. Allan
Part of the Optical Physics and Engineering book series (OPEG)


In the previous chapters we have discussed in detail the physical and optical properties of the optical fibre. However, the major applications of the technology of fibre optics utilize the properties of assemblies of such fibres. The next few chapters will be devoted to a discussion of these properties and the techniques involved in manufacturing such assemblies, or bundles as they are generally called.


Optical Fibre Fibre Diameter Light Guide Lens System Fibre Core 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Company Ltd 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. B. Allan
    • 1
  1. 1.Ministry of DefenceSevenoaks, KentUK

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