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Vision pp 143-163 | Cite as

Solid-State Photographic Systems, Light Amplifiers, and Display Systems

  • Albert Rose
Part of the Optical Physics and Engineering book series (OPEG)

Abstract

There is clearly a redundancy in the title of this chapter. A photographic system, for example, is also a light amplifier and a display system. On the other hand, the literature tends to classify a wide range of devices according to whether their primary functions are photographic, amplifying, or display. The common trend in all of the devices is that, with few exceptions, the input light is absorbed by a layer of photoconductive material and the resultant changes in conductivity, charge, or voltage are used in conjunction with a second mechanism to form an image. This chapter explores the fundamental limitations on the sensitivity of such photoconductive layers.

Keywords

Ohmic Contact Dark Current Extra Electron Shallow Trap Optical Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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General

  1. J. H. Dessauer and H. E. Clark, Xerography and Related Processes (1965), Focal Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. M. A. Lampert and P. Mark, Current Injection in Solids (1970), Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
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  4. R. M. Schaffert, Electrophotography (1965), Focal Press, New York.Google Scholar
  5. H. V. Soule, Electro-Optical Photography at Low Illumination Levels, Chapt. 9 (1968), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.David Sarnoff Research CenterRCAPrincetonUSA

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