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Vision pp 29-53 | Cite as

Human Vision

  • Albert Rose
Part of the Optical Physics and Engineering book series (OPEG)

Abstract

The human visual system has attained a remarkable level of sophistication. The scientists engaged in matching its performance by some electronic or chemical system can only marvel at its sensitivity, its compactness, its long life, its high degree of reproducibility, and its elegant adaptation to the needs of the human system. It is true that the attempts at man-made systems date back only a scant hundred years, while the human visual system has been millions of years in the making. But the human visual system had to emerge from some cosmic scrambling of the elements, repeated and repeated and repeated until by chance the happy combination fell into place. While there are few who would question the blind, probabilistic, evolutionary origin of the human species, there are none who can delineate the steps. The shortfalls have long since vanished without a trace.

Keywords

Quantum Efficiency Visual Process Human Visual System Dark Adaptation Human Vision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.David Sarnoff Research CenterRCAPrincetonUSA

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