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Vision pp 1-27 | Cite as

The Visual Process

  • Albert Rose
Part of the Optical Physics and Engineering book series (OPEG)

Abstract

It would be difficult to find a more cogent confrontation between physics and biology than in the visual process. Nature was faced from the beginning with the hard fact that light consists of a finite number of bits of energy, called “photons” or “quanta.” Whatever visual information was to be distilled out of the surrounding world was circumscribed by the profound constraints imposed by the discrete nature of light.

Keywords

False Alarm Test Pattern Black Spot Motion Picture Photon Density 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    J. W. Coltman and A. E. Anderson, Noise limitations of resolving power in electronic imaging. Proc. IRE 48, 858–865 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    L. Hayen and R. Verbrugghe, A comparison of the signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity of film and plumbicon camera, J. Soc. Motion Picture Television Engrs. 81, 184 (1972). The authors find that the signal-to-noise ratio of a studio television picture exceeds that of 16-mm, color reversal film, ASA-125. Many of the 16-mm film clips used on television are significantly noisier than the color film used by these authors.Google Scholar
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    R. E. Sturm and R. H. Morgan, Screen intensification systems and their limitations, Am. J. Roentgenol. Radium Therapy 62, 617 (1949).Google Scholar

General

  1. R. Clark Jones, “Quantum Efficiency of Detectors for Visible Infrared Radiation,” in Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics, Vol. 11, pp. 87–183 (1959), Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. A. Rose, “Television Camera Tubes and the Problem of Vision,” in Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics, Vol. 1, pp. 131–166 (1948), Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  3. A. Rose, “Quantum Effects in Human Vision,” in Advances in Biological and Medical Physics, Vol. 5, pp. 211–242 (1957), Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  4. O. H. Schade, The resolving-power functions and quantum processes of television cameras, RCA Rev 28, 460–535 (1967).Google Scholar
  5. R. E. Sturm and R. H. Morgan, Screen intensification systems and their limitations, Am. J. Roentgenol. Radium Therapy 62, 617 (1949).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.David Sarnoff Research CenterRCAPrincetonUSA

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