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Interferon pp 178-197 | Cite as

Clinical Trials of Stimulators of Endogenous Interferon

  • V. D. Solov’ev
  • T. A. Bektemirov

Abstract

Interferon formation in man is known to take place both in natural virus infections and after artificial introduction of viral and nonviral agents into the body [455, 594, 597]. It was evidently Isaacs [366] who first pointed out the desirability of using stimulators of endogenous interferon for the prevention and treatment of virus infections. Many other workers have subsequently shown that the course of virus infections can be influenced by administration of interferon inducers of viral and nonviral origin [11, 39, 82, 83, 84, 86, 126, 128, 136, 189, 288–290]. However, most investigations have been carried out in the form of animal experiments. Comparatively few clinical studies of interferon induction in man have been undertaken. The first report of interferon production in man in response to injection of inactivated viruses was made by Wheelock and Dingle [596]. To treat a patient with acute myeloid leukemia they injected large doses of various inactivated viruses intravenously and repeatedly at intervals of 4–14 days, and in some cases they found interferon in the blood. The patient received consecutive injections of NDV, influenza virus, and Semliki forest virus and a marked but transient improvement in his condition was observed.

Keywords

Influenza Virus Newcastle Disease Virus Acute Respiratory Infection Intranasal Administration Measle Vaccine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. D. Solov’ev
    • 1
  • T. A. Bektemirov
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of VirologyCentral Postgraduate Medical InstituteMoscowUSSR

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