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Electrolyte Effects on Micellar Catalysis

  • C. A. Bunton

Abstract

In classifying chemical reactions, it is convenient to define the mechanism in terms of the molecularity of the slow, rate limiting, step. If only the substrate is undergoing covalency changes in this step, the reaction is considered to be unimolecular, i. e., it follows a dissociative mechanism, but if both substrate and an external reagent undergo covalency changes in this step, the reaction is considered to be bimolecular, i. e., it follows an associative mechanism. This nomenclature system is used extensively, and has been discussed in detail in numerous monographs [1, 2, 3].

Keywords

Bimolecular Reaction Micellar Structure Micellar Catalysis Cationic Micelle Micellar Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. Bunton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA

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