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Hypothalamic Mechanisms Controlling Anterior Pituitary Functions

  • L. Martini

Abstract

It is now generally accepted that the central nervous system (CNS) plays an essential role in the regulation of many endocrine functions and that the hypothalamus is the crucial element of such regulation (Mangili et al. 1966, Martini et al. 1968a, Mess and Martini 1968, Motta et al. 1969a). The key position of the hypothalamus is due to its strategic location in close contact with the anterior pituitary gland, and to the fact that this region of the brain contains particular neurons which synthesize the chemical messengers necessary for stimulating or for inhibiting the anterior pituitary (the so-called hypothalamic releasing and inhibitory factors), as well as feedback receptors whose activity is modified by hormonal influences (Mangili et al. 1966, Martini et al. 1968a, Mess and Martini 1968; Motta et al. 1969a).

Keywords

Seminal Vesicle Anterior Pituitary Feedback Effect Paraventricular Nucleus Median Eminence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Martini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of MilanMilanItaly

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