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Stabilization of Cellulosic Desalination Membranes by Crosslinking

  • D. L. Hoernschemeyer
  • R. W. Lawrence
  • C. W. SaltonstallJr.
  • O. S. Schaeffler

Abstract

C. E. Reid and coworkers[1] discovered that, among many polymers, cellulose acetate exhibits an exceptionally selective permeability toward water in salt solutions under conditions of reverse osmosis. Subsequently, Loeb and Sourirajan[2] developed a method of fabrication for water-swollen cellulose acetate membranes with greatly increased flux rates but which retain much of the selectivity (“salt rejection”) of ordinary films. The practicality of the so-called asymmetric membranes of this type is now established by their use in commercial reverse osmosis desalination equipment. Further increases in water flux, however, are highly desirable in order to reduce the cost of the reverse osmosis process. The preparation of membranes with both increased flux and improved flux stability was the object of the work described herein.

Keywords

Active Layer Cellulose Acetate Reverse Osmosis Casting Solution Sodium Bisulfite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. L. Hoernschemeyer
    • 1
  • R. W. Lawrence
    • 1
  • C. W. SaltonstallJr.
    • 1
  • O. S. Schaeffler
    • 1
  1. 1.Envirogenics CompanyEl MonteUSA

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