Advertisement

Cellulose Acetate Blend Membranes

  • W. M. King
  • D. L. Hoernschemeyer
  • C. W. SaltonstallJr.

Abstract

Dense films of cellulose diacetate have been shown to be intrinsically capable of very high salt rejection in reverse osmosis, albeit at uneconomical water fluxes[1,2,3]. The water and salt permeabilities obtained in these measurements indicate that membranes of cellulose diacetate should reject at least 99.8% of the salt in a 3.5% sodium chloride solution at 102 atm (1500 psi)[2]. Both Reid and Breton[1] and Lonsdale et al.[2] also showed that the intrinsic permeabilities to both salt and water decrease as the acetyl substitution of the cellulose diacetate is increased. Since the salt permeability decreases much more rapidly with increasing substitution than the water permeability, cellulose triacetate should provide a higher salt rejection than cellulose diacetate.

Keywords

Active Layer Cellulose Acetate Maleic Acid Reverse Osmosis Casting Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    C. E. Reid and E. J. Breton, J. Appl. Pol. Sci., 1, 133 (1959).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. K. Lonsdale, U. Merten and R. L. Riley, J. Appl. Pol. Sci. 9, 1341 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    P. A. Cantor, et al., in “Development of Improved Cellulose Ester Reverse Osmosis Membranes,” Office of Saline Water Research and Development Report No. 434, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    S. Loeb in Desalination by Reverse Osmosis U. Merten, (Ed.), The M.I.T. Press, Cambridge, Mass. 1966, Chapter 3.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    B. Keilin in “The Mechanism of Desalination by Reverse Osmosis,” Office of Saline Water Research and Development Progress Report No. 117, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    S. Loeb and S. Sourirajan, Advan. Chem. Ser. 38, 117 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    W. M. King and M. L. O’Hair in “Seawater Tubular Reverse Osmosis Membranes,” Office of Saline Water Research and Development Report No. 695, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    M. A. Frommer, R. Matz, and R. Bloch in “Saline Water Conversion Report for 1970–1971,” U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    W. M. King, et al., in “High Retention Tubular Membranes for Reverse Osmosis,” Office of Saline Water Research and Development Report No. 682, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    C. W. Saltonstall, Jr., W. M. King and D. L. Hoernschemeyer, Desalination 4, 309 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    P. A. Cantor, et al., in “Development and Scale–up of New and Improved Cellulose Ester Membranes,” Aerojet–General Corporation Report No. 4868–01–F, a final report to the Office of Saline Water, U. S. Department of the Interior, Contract No. 14–01–0001–1767, May 1969.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    D. L. Hoernschemeyer, et al., in “Research and Development of New and Improved Cellulose Ester Membranes,” Envirogenics Co. Report No. 1319–02–F, a final report to the Office of Saline Water, U. S. Department of the Interior, Contract No. 14–01–0001–2205, April 1971.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    P. A. Cantor, et al., in “Biological Degradation of Cellulose Acetate Reverse-Osmosis Membranes,” Office of Saline Water Research and Development Report No. 340, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    R. W. Lawrence, et al., in “Development of Storage Techniques for Reverse-Osmosis Membranes,” Office of Saline Water Research and Development Report No. 673, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    A. J. Secchi, unpublished results, Envirogenics Co.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    C. W. Saltonstall, Jr., et al., “Development of Stable, High–Flux Brackish–Water Membranes,” Aerojet–General Corporation Report No. 1350–F, a final report to the Office of Saline Water, U. S. Department of the Interior, Contract No. 14–0001–2182, June 1970.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. M. King
    • 1
  • D. L. Hoernschemeyer
    • 1
  • C. W. SaltonstallJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Envirogenics CompanyEl MonteUSA

Personalised recommendations