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Development of in Situ Casting of Reverse Osmosis Membrane Tubules through the Hydrocasting Method

  • A. Gollan
  • M. P. Tulin

Abstract

Hydrocasting is a hydrodynamic process for the fabrication of long membrane tubules of small diameter (less than 3 mm) with skin on the interior wall and good desalination characteristics. It is based on a phenomenon described by Fairbrother and Stubbs [1] and later studied in detail by Sir G. I. Taylor[2]. It may be simply described as follows: when a gas is blown into one end of a tube containing a viscous fluid, forcing it out at the far end, a fraction of the fluid remains deposited on the wall of the tube in the form of a uniform annular layer. Tulin[3] first proposed to utilize this phenomenon for the casting of small diameter tubular reverse osmosis membranes.

Keywords

Ultimate Tensile Strength Cellulose Acetate Casting Solution Membrane Tubule Reverse Osmosis Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Gollan
    • 1
  • M. P. Tulin
    • 1
  1. 1.Hydronautics, IncorporatedLaurelUSA

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