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Particulate Emission from Spark-Ignition Engines

  • G. S. Springer

Abstract

During the past fifteen years the gaseous components of automotive exhaust have been widely investigated to evaluate their role in air pollution. Relatively little effort has been devoted to the study of particulates emitted from automotive engines. The reason for the greater interest in gaseous emissions is understandable since gaseous components are emitted in considerably larger amounts than particulates, as illustrated in Fig. 1. Nevertheless, gasoline engines still introduce into the United States’ atmosphere about one million tons of particulate matter annually,(1) contributing significantly to air pollution. Most notably, particulates affect (a) solar radiation and climate near the ground, (b) visibility, (c) material damage, (d) vegetation, and (e) health. In this paper, these effects are not examined in detail (interested readers are referred to the comprehensive summaries given in Ref. 2); instead, attention is focused on the emission of particulates from spark-ignition engines.

Keywords

Emission Rate Particulate Emission Lead Content Exhaust System Exhaust Pipe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. S. Springer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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