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Mechanism of Hydrocarbon Formation in Combustion Processes

  • R. A. Matula

Abstract

Emissions from transportation systems that derive their energy directly from combustion processes include products of incomplete combustion, oxides of nitrogen, oxides of sulfur, and lead and other trace metals that are employed as combustion-improving additives. Emissions associated with the products of incomplete combustion can be further subdivided to include carbon monoxide, gaseous hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatics, odor, and combustible particulates.

Keywords

Diesel Engine Combustion Process Shock Tube Equivalence Ratio Induction Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Matula
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Studies InstituteDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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