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The Chemistry of Spark-Ignition Engine Combustion and Emission Formation

  • J. B. Edwards

Abstract

The ability of the spark-ignition engine to release chemical energy via combustion reactions and transform this energy into mechanical energy is well known. The engine may be visualized as a combination of parallel but out of phase batch reactors. These are commonly called the combustion chambers. Four-, six-, or eight-batch reactors are arranged in parallel. The effluent from these batch reactors is combined in one or two pulsating-flow reactors, called the exhaust system.

Keywords

Nitric Oxide Combustion Chamber Exhaust System Pyrolytic Reaction Cool Flame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. Edwards
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringThe University of DetroitDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Chrysler CorporationHighland ParkUSA

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