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The Temporal Requirements for Androgens During the Cell Cycle of the Prostate Gland

  • Michael F. Carter
  • Leland W. K. Chung
  • Donald S. Coffey

Abstract

Dr. William Wallace Scott has focused a considerable portion of his efforts toward defining the clinical parameters and physiological factors which are important in understanding and controlling the growth of the prostate gland. Dr. Scott defined the ultimate clinical goal in his statement, “What a glorious day it will be for urology when we can shrink the benign nodular hyperplastic prostate, quiet the carcinomatous one and increase the libido and potentia all with a tablet. Oh happy day!”(1) Dr. Scott has initiated this long and difficult journey through a series of contributions which have formed a systematic framework for the evaluation and search for new inhibitors of prostatic growth(1–18). This has been exemplified by his leadership in the recent development of antiandrogenic drugs, which introduce a great deal of promise as a new approach for the effective treatment of benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma(12,14,17,18).

Keywords

Prostate Gland Cyproterone Acetate Ventral Prostate Prostatic Growth Testosterone Propionate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael F. Carter
    • 1
  • Leland W. K. Chung
    • 1
  • Donald S. Coffey
    • 1
  1. 1.The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticsThe Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA

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