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Steroid Hormones and Aggressive Behavior in Mammals

  • F. H. Bronson
  • C. Desjardins

Abstract

Certain steroid hormones have the ability to alter or modulate the level of excitability in adult brain structures that control the expression of aggression in some mammalian species. Steroids also have been implicated recently in the organization of these same neural tissues during critical periods of development. Conversely, concentrations of circulating hormones in the adult animal may be altered because of an aggressive encounter or because of stimuli inherent in a chronic dominance-subordination social system. The purpose of the present discussion, then, is to overview the literature concerning these relationships. On the behavioral side, we will be interested primarily in “spontaneous” or “inter-male” aggression (Scott, 1966 and Moyer, 1968, respectively) with a nod of recognition to the problems engendered by such categorization as well as by the term aggression itself (cf., Barnett, 1969). Taxonomically, this discussion will, by necessity, rely heavily on studies using house mice with rats and other mammals being considered secondarily.

Keywords

Gonadal Function Testosterone Propionate Wild Rabbit Testosterone Propionate Sive Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. H. Bronson
    • 1
  • C. Desjardins
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of TexasAustinUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and PharmacologyOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA

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