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Algae and Man pp 239-261 | Cite as

Algae in Water Supplies of the United States

  • C. Mervin Palmer

Abstract

In the United States the important sources of water for cities and towns are ground waters and surface waters. Algae may. develop in water from underground sources after it is exposed to sunlight. Surface waters invariably are habitats for the growth of algae. The amount of growth may be small or very extensive depending upon the concentration of nutrients, turbidity, temperature, and length of exposure to light.

Keywords

Water Supply Algal Growth Copper Sulfate Filamentous Alga Water Weed 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Mervin Palmer
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health ServiceRobert A. Taft Sanitary Engineering CenterCincinnatiUSA

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