Advertisement

Laser Spectroscopy Applied to Combustion

  • Antonio D’Alessio
  • Antonio Cavaliere
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 241)

Abstract

Researches on combustion and spectroscopy have been closely related since the very beginning at the time of Kirchhoff, Bunsen and Faraday. Since then every generation of spectroscopists gave its contribution to the understanding of combustion and used these sources for a deepening of their field. The purpose of this short paper is to highlight the actual relationship between these two fields of research.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Flame Front Laser Induce Fluorescence Soot Particle Diffusion Flame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    N. Peters, Twenty-first Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1231, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1987).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R.W. Bilger, Twenty-second Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.475, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1989).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A.C. Eckbreth, “Laser diagnostics for combustion temperature and species”, A.K. Gupta and D.G. Lilley Eds., Energy and Engineering Science Series, Vol.7, Abacus Press, Tunbridge Wells (Kent) and Cambridge (MA), (1988).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. Haumann, A. Leipertz, Opts. Letts. 9:487 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    R.W. Dibble, R.E. Hollenbach, Eigtheenth Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1489, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1981).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    K.N.C. Bray, P.A. Libby, J.B. Moss, Comb. Flame 56:199 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    B. Yip, M.B. Long, Opts. Letts. 11:64 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    A. Borghese, A. D’Alessio, M. Diana, C. Venitozzi, Twenty-second Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1251, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1989).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    A.R. Masri, R.W. Dibble, Twenty-second Symp. (Int.) on Comb., The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1989).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    A.R. Masri, R.W. Bilger, R.W. Dibble, “Local structure of turbulent nonpremixed flames near extinction”, in Comb. Flame to be published.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    S.C. Johnstone, “An experimental investigation into the application of spontaneous Raman scattering to spray measurements in an engine”, Proc. of ASME Fluids Engineering Conf., Morrept Ed., p.107, ASME, N.Y. (1981).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    F. Pischinger, U. Reuter, E. Scheid, “Self-ignition of diesel sprays and its dependence on fuel properties and injection parameters”, ASME paper, 88-ICE-14 (1988).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    A.C. Eckbreth, J. Appl. Phys. 48:4473 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    J.P. Taran, “Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy”, Proc. V Int. Conf. on Raman Spectroscopy, p.595, Schulz, Freiburg, FRG (1976).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    A.C. Eckbreth, Eigtheenth Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1471, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1981).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    R.K. Hanson, Twenty-first Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1677, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1987).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    G. Kychakoff, R.K. Hanson, R.D. Howe, Appl. Opt. 23:704 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Goldsmith, Appl. Opt. 26:3566 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    N.L. Garland, D.R. Crosley, Twenty-first Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1693, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1987).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    P.W. Fairchild, G.P. Smith, D.R. Crosley, J. Chem. Phys. 79:1795 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    G. Zizak, J.A. La Nauze, J.D. Winefordner, Comb. Flame 65:203 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    K. Kohse-Höinghause, R. Keindenreich, Th. Just, Twentieth Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1177, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1985).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    N.M. Laurendeau, Opts. Letts. 14:280 (1989).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    R. Schwarzwald, P. Monkhouse, J. Wolfrum, Twenty-second Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1413, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1988).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    N.S. Bergamo, P.A. Jaanimagi, M.M. Salour, J.H. Bechtel, Opts. Letts. 8:443 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    R. Schwarzwald, P. Monkhouse, J. Wolfrum, Chem. Phys. Lett. 142:15 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    P. Andresen, B. Bath, H.W. Lülf, G. Meijer, J.J. Ter Meulen, Appl. Opt. 27:365 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    P. Andresen, G. Meijer, H. Schlüter, “Fluorescence imaging inside an internal combustion engine using tunable excimer lasers”, to be published in Appl. Opt.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    J.B. Jeffries, R.A. Copeland, G.P. Smith, D.R. Crosley, Twenty-first Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1709, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1987).Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    M. Aldén, H. Edner, S. Svanberg, Appl. Phys. 29:93 (1982).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    M. Aldén, H. Edner, S. Wallin, Opts. Letts. 10:529 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    M.G. Allen, R.K. Hanson, Twenty-first Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1755, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1987).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    M.N.R. Ashfold, Mol. Phys. 58:1 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Lamba Highlights no.15/16: a publication by Lambda Physik, December 1989.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    A. D’Alessio, “Laser light scattering and fluorescence diagnostics of rich flames produced by gaseous and liquid fuels”, in“Particulate Carbon: Formation during Combustion”, D.C. Siegla and G. W. Smith Eds., p.207, Plenum Press, N.Y. (1981).Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    F. Beretta, V. Cincotti, A. D’Alessio, P. Menna, Comb. Flame 61:221 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    L. Petarca, F. Marconi, “Fluorescence spectra and polycyclic aromatic species in a n-Heptane diffusion flame”, to be published in Comb. Flame.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    R. Barbella, F. Beretta, A. Ciajolo, A. D’Alessio, M.V. Prati, A. Tregrossi, “Optical and chemical characterization of carbon polymorphs formed during spray combustion of hydrocarbons”, to be published on Comb. Sci. Tech.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    D.L. Peterson, F.E. Lytle, N.M. Laurendeau, Appl. Opt. 27:2768 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    A. Leger, L. d’Henecourt and N. Boccara Eds., “Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Astrophysics”, NATO ASI Series, D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht (NL) (1986).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    B.M. Vaglieco, A. D’Alessio, F. Beretta, “Determination of the optical properties in the u.v.-visible of carbonaceous matter produced in rich flames by scattering and extinction measurements”, in “Experiments on Cosmic Dust Analogues”, E. Bussoletti et al. Eds., Kluwer Academic Publishers, p.181 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    B.M. Vaglieco, A. D’Alessio, F. Beretta, “In-situ evaluation of the soot refractive index in the u.v.-visible from the measurement of the scattering and the extinction coefficient in rich flames”, to be published in Comb. Flame.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    T.T. Charalumpopoulos, J.D. Felska, Comb. Flame 68:283 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    D.R. Huffman, “Methods and difficulties in laboratory studies of cosmic dust analogues” in “Experiments on Cosmic Dust Analogues”, Bussoletti et al. Eds., p.25, Kluwer Academic Publishers (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    L.M. Hanssen, W.A. Carrington, J.E. Butler, K.A. Snail, Materials Letts. 7:289 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    Proc. 2nd Int. Aerosol Conf. Berlin on “Aerosol: Formation and Reactivity”, Pergamon Press (1986).Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    M. Kerker, “Light scattering theory: a progress report”, in “Proceedings of Int. Symp. on Optical Particle Sizing: Theory and Practice”, University of Rouen, may 1987.Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    H. Chew, Phys. Rev. A 19:2137 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    M. Kerker, D.S. Wang, H. Chew, Appl. Opt. 19:4159 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. 50.
    J. Zang, D.H. Leach, R.K. Chang, Opts. Letts. 13:270 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    S. Quian, J.B. Snow, R.K. Chang, Opts. Letts. 10:499 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    J.M. Béer, D.S. Taylor, D. Abbott, G.C. McCreath, “A laser diagnostics for the measurement of droplet and particle size distribution”, AIAA 14th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Washington D. C., Paper No.76–79 (1977).Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    G. König, K. Anders, A. Frohn, J. Aerosol Sci. 17:157 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    F. Beretta, A. Cavaliere, A. D’Alessio, Comb. Flame 49:183 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. 55.
    F. Beretta, A. Cavaliere, A. D’Alessio, Comb. Sci. Techn. 36:19 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    F. Beretta, A. Cavaliere, A. D’Alessio, Twentieth Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1249, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1985).Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    A. Cavaliere, R. Ragucci, A. D’Alessio, C. Noviello, Proc. of the “Conference on Heat and Mass Transfer in Gasoline and Diesel Engine”, Spolding Ed., Hemisphere Publishing Co., N.Y. (1988).Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    A. Cavaliere, R. Ragucci, A. D’Alessio, C. Noviello, Twenty-second Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1973, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1989).Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    A. Cavaliere, R. Ragucci, A. D’Alessio, P. Massoli, Proc. 4th Int. Conf. “Computational Methods and Experimental Measurements”, CMEM’89, S. Carlomagno Ed., p.189, CUEN, Naples (1989).Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    J.M. Tishkoff, D.C. Hammond, A.R. Chraplyny, J. Fluids Eng. 104:313 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    L.A. Melton, J.F. Verdieck, Twentieth Symp. (Int.) on Comb., p.1283, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh (1985).Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    N. Roth, K. Anders, A. Frohn, “Temporal evolution of size and temperature measurements of burning ethanol droplets for different initial temperatures”, Joint Meeting of the German and Italian Sections of the Combustion Institute, p.2.3, CUEN, Naples (1989).Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    P. Massoli, private communication.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio D’Alessio
    • 1
  • Antonio Cavaliere
    • 2
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Ingegneria ChimicaUniversità di NapoliNapoliItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Ingegneria ChimicaUniversità di PisaPisaItaly

Personalised recommendations