Coronaviruses pp 231-237 | Cite as

Differential Effects of MHV-4 Infection of Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes in Vitro

  • R. L. Knobler
  • R. Cole
  • J. de Vellis
  • H. Lewicki
  • M. J. Buchmeier
  • M. B. A. Oldstone
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 218)

Abstract

Mouse hepatitis virus, type-4 (strain JHM) has been studied extensively as a model for neurologic disease. Intracerebral infection may lead to fatal encephalomyelitis or may be limited to demyelination (1). Prior to demyelination by myelin stripping macrophages (2), connections between myelin-forming oligodendrocytes and myelin sheaths, not ordinarily visible in the adult nervous system, become apparent (3). Of particular interest, in regard to this observation, demyelination in this model system is followed by remyelination mediated by oligo-dendrocytes (4, 5). However, virus persistence and limited areas of recurrent demyelination may occur (5, 6).

Keywords

Hepatitis Hydrocortisone Fluor Fluorescein Encephalitis 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Knobler
    • 1
  • R. Cole
    • 2
  • J. de Vellis
    • 2
  • H. Lewicki
    • 3
  • M. J. Buchmeier
    • 3
  • M. B. A. Oldstone
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyJefferson Medical CollegePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of ImmunologyScripps Clinic and Research FoundationLa JollaUSA

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