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The Receptor-Mediated Interaction of Lipoproteins with Liver Cells

  • Theo J. C. van Berkel
  • J. Kar Kruijt
  • J. Fred Nagelkerke
  • Leen Harkes
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 210)

Abstract

Investigations on the quantitative role of the various cell types (parenchymal, Kupffer and endothelial cells) to the receptor-mediated uptake by the liver in vivo, were until recently hampered by the applied cell isolation procedures during which bound and/or internalized substances were processed and lost from the cells. The procedures as outlined. in scheme 1 prevents such a processing because both liver perfusion, cell separation and cell purification are performed at a low temperature (at 8°C). In addition one is able to assess the recovery by comparing the radioactivity in the purified parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cells (all obtained from one liver) to the radioactivity originally present in the whole rat liver. The method was evaluated using125 I-asialofetuin as the substrate and compared to quantitative autoradiographic data (1).

Keywords

Parenchymal Cell Kupffer Cell Cholesteryl Ester Total Liver Nylon Gauze 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theo J. C. van Berkel
    • 1
  • J. Kar Kruijt
    • 1
  • J. Fred Nagelkerke
    • 1
  • Leen Harkes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry IErasmus University RotterdamRotterdamThe Netherlands

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