S-Adenosylmethionine Metabolism as a Target for Adenosine Toxicity

  • E. Olavi Kajander
  • Masaru Kubota
  • Eric H. Willis
  • Dennis A. Carson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 131)

Abstract

Adenosine exerts marked cytostatic and cytotoxic actions to mammalian cells. The nucleoside has been reported to inhibit pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, to foster cyclic AMP accumulation and to cause the accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy).1,2 Adenosine kinase (EC 2.7.1.20) deficient mammalian cells do not phosphorylate adenosine, but adenosine still blocks their growth, and this Is not reversed by addition of uridine. 2,3 Thus, adenosine may exert toxicity at the nucleoside level. Also, some adenosine analogs are cytotoxic without being converted to nucleotides.4

Keywords

Toxicity Filtration Lymphoma Cysteine Adenosine 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Olavi Kajander
    • 1
  • Masaru Kubota
    • 1
  • Eric H. Willis
    • 1
  • Dennis A. Carson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Basic and Clinical ResearchScripps Clinic and Research FoundationLa JollaUSA

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