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Changes in the Levels of Plant Secondary Metabolites Under Water and Nutrient Stress

  • Chapter
Phytochemical Adaptations to Stress

Part of the book series: Recent Advances in Phytochemistry ((RAPT,volume 18))

Abstract

Increasing interest in the stress physiology of higher plants has, in the last few years, greatly expanded our knowledge concerning the effects of stresses such as drought, freezing, nutrient deficiencies, disease and insect attack on plant metabolism. This work, however, has concentrated on the influences of stress on the basic processes of growth and development (primary metabolism). Very little attention has been paid to the changes in secondary metabolism that may be occurring. Information on the effects of stress conditions on secondary metabolites has come mainly from research efforts to maximize the yield of active constituents from herb, spice and drug plants and from attempts to reduce the levels of toxins in certain food and forage crops. Advances in our understanding of the functional roles of secondary metabolites in plants, however, and new information about how pest resistance is altered by stress should stimulate additional interest in the responses of secondary metabolites to stress.

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Gershenzon, J. (1984). Changes in the Levels of Plant Secondary Metabolites Under Water and Nutrient Stress. In: Timmermann, B.N., Steelink, C., Loewus, F.A. (eds) Phytochemical Adaptations to Stress. Recent Advances in Phytochemistry, vol 18. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-1206-2_10

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