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Toward a Unified Componential Theory of Human Intelligence: I. Fluid Ability

  • Robert J. Sternberg
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 14)

Abstract

A progress report on the development of a unified theory of human intelligence is presented. The report deals with that portion of the theory that concerns fluid ability, which is viewed as roughly synonymous with reasoning. The unified theory applied to reasoning comprises a number of hierarchically nested subtheories, each of which accounts for successively more specific aspects of human reasoning behavior. The basic unit of the theory is the component: It is claimed that a relatively small set of components can account for behavior in a wide range of reasoning tasks, and that individual components are general across the vertical range of the hierarchy. The components and the sub-theories in which they play a part are briefly described, and where available, data testing the subtheories are summarized. These data provide at least tentative support for the proposed theoretical structure.

Keywords

Spatial Ability Verbal Ability Human Intelligence Answer Option Transitive Inference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference Notes

  1. Sternberg, R. J. Components of human intelligence. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 19.) New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1979.Google Scholar
  2. Sternberg, R. J. The construct validity of aptitude tests: An information-processing assessment. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 20.) New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1979.Google Scholar
  3. Sternberg, R. J. Toward a unified componential theory of human reasoning. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 4.) New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1978.Google Scholar
  4. Guyote, M.J., and Sternberg, R. J. A transitive-chain theory of syllogistic reasoning. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 5.) New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1978.Google Scholar
  5. Sternberg, R. J., and Turner, M. E. Components of syllogistic reasoning. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 6.) New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1978.Google Scholar
  6. Sternberg, R. J., and Gardner, M. K. Unities in inductive reasoning. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 18.) New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1979.Google Scholar
  7. Sternberg, R. J., and Nigro, G, Components of metaphoric comprehension and appreciation. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 22). New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1980.Google Scholar
  8. Schustack, M. W., and Sternberg, R. J. Inferring causality: How hypothesized causes are evaluated. (NR 150–412 ONR Technical Report No. 21). New Haven: Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1979.Google Scholar

Section 1: Reference

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  7. Sternberg, R. J. A proposed resolution of curious conflicts in the literature on linear syllogisms. In R. Nickerson (Ed.), Attention and performance VIII. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum, in press, (b)Google Scholar
  8. Sternberg, R. J. Representation and process in linear syllogistic reasoning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, in press, (c)Google Scholar
  9. Sternberg, R. J., Guyote, M. J., and Turner, M. E. Deductive reasoning. In R. Snow, P. A. Federico, and W. Montague (Eds.), Aptitude, learning, and instruction: Cognitive process analysis. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum, in press.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Sternberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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