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Test Structure and Cognitive Style

  • J. Weinman
  • A. Elithorn
  • S. Farag
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 14)

Abstract

Some studies examining the nature of performance differences on a single cognitive test are reported. Most of the work is concerned with the analysis of response times and with the fragmentation of these into component times for different phases of problem-solving. The results indicate that while overall processing speed is primarily cognitively determined, the way in which time is distributed over different phases of performance is greatly influenced by personality factors. The analysis of responses revealed characteristic strategies and errors associated with level of ability. The importance of task parameters in eliciting these indices of performance differences is discussed.

Keywords

Search Time Cognitive Style Test Structure Solution Path Search Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Weinman
    • 1
  • A. Elithorn
    • 1
  • S. Farag
    • 1
  1. 1.Guys Hospital Medical SchoolLondonEngland

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