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Methods of Investigation

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Abstract

Since resinography is literally the graphic description of resins, polymers, and their products, any scheme of investigation which produces a graphic record is important here. The record could be simply a handwritten one, or typed on a punch card as in Figure 2-1. For easier retrieval, the information could be punched on tape to be fed to a computer memory. Rather than a written record, a pictorial one is often more exact and more compact, since it is the traditional equivalent of a thousand words (see Figure 2-2, which is a photograph showing the structure and morphology of a wartime automobile tire). Finer detail can be recorded by resorting to microscopy, as is evident in Figure 2-3, a montage of three photomicrographs which show the fine structure (at appropriate resolution) of an entire cross section of a commercial artificial leather. Sometimes a cinematograph (a succession of frames on a moving-picture film) provides the record, as in Figure 1-2 of the preceding chapter. And of course, the photomicrograph may be obtained at higher resolution by using an electron microscope, as in Figure 2-4, which shows the very fine structure of an acrylic fiber.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Electron Spin Resonance Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrum Ethyl Acrylate Abietic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Suggestions for Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.North Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityUSA

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