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The Role of the Social Worker

  • James F. Porter
Chapter

Abstract

The role of the social worker is to identify and work with the frustrations, demands, and conflicts encountered by families of individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Children with PWS present unique needs to their families and communities. Poor muscle tone, difficulty in feeding, and non-responsiveness are major concerns during infancy. Early in childhood, the presence of developmental delay and mental retardation is compounded by the emergence of an insatiable drive for food and the potential for morbid obesity. Over time, behavioral problems intensify, and by adolescence the combination of emotional lability and lack of secondary sexual growth seriously hinders adaptation. As the child with PWS approaches adulthood, decisions need to be made regarding future vocational and living environments in the community.

Keywords

Social Worker Morbid Obesity Developmental Disability Community Resource Respite Care 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. Porter

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