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Aspartame and Human Behavior: Cognitive and Behavioral Observations

  • Paul Spiers
  • Donald Schomer
  • LuAnn Sabounjian
  • Harris Lieberman
  • Richard Wurtman
  • John Duguid
  • Riley McCarten
  • Michele Lyden
Chapter

Abstract

Little is known regarding the possible cognitive and behavioral effects of the artificial sweetener aspartame in humans. Few, if any, studies have addressed the issues raised by the potential elevation of brain phenylalanine levels which may be induced by aspartame ingestion and the concomitant depletion in specific neurotransmitter supplies which may result. In this chapter, the relevant literature addressing this topic is reviewed, the results of a new double-blind, acute study are briefly summarized, and findings from the pilot phase of a new chronic exposure study are reviewed.

Keywords

Stroop Interference Subjective Complaint Reaction Time Test Plasma Phenylalanine Wisconsin General Test Apparatus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Spiers
    • 1
  • Donald Schomer
    • 1
  • LuAnn Sabounjian
    • 1
  • Harris Lieberman
    • 2
  • Richard Wurtman
    • 2
  • John Duguid
    • 2
  • Riley McCarten
    • 2
  • Michele Lyden
    • 2
  1. 1.Behavioral Neurology Unit and the Comprehensive Epilepsy CenterHarvard University Medical School, Beth Israel HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Clinical Research CenterMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyUSA

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