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Regional Changes in Intramyocardial Pressure Following Myocardial Ischemia

  • David T. Kelly
  • Bertram Pitt
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 39)

Abstract

Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated the presence of regional abnormalities in myocardial blood flow during ischemia (1). The finding of relative subendocardial ischemia following coronary artery occlusion is thought to be due to a decrease in the diastolic coronary perfusion gradient (2). This gradient depends upon the relationship between the distal coronary artery perfusion pressure and left ventricular end diastolic pressure. The present study was undertaken to determine whether delayed relaxation might also occur following myocardial ischemia and thereby further compromise the effect of diastolic coronary perfusion gradient.

Keywords

Coronary Artery Myocardial Blood Flow Left Ventricular Cavity Circumflex Coronary Artery Left Circumflex Coronary Artery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Becker, L.C., Fortuin, N.J., Pitt, B.: Effect of ischemia and antianginal drugs on the distribution of radioactive microspheres in the canine left ventricle. Circ. Res. 28:263, 1971.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Becker, L., Pitt, B.: Regional myocardial blood flow, ischemia and antianginal drugs. Annals of Clinical Research 3:353, 1971.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bing, O.H.L., Keefe, J.F., Wolk, M.J., Finkelstein, L.J., Levine, H.J.: Tension prolongation during recovery from myocardial hypoxia. Journal of Clinical Investigation 50:660, 1971.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • David T. Kelly
    • 1
  • Bertram Pitt
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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