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Evolution of Myoglobin Amino Acid Sequences in Primates and Other Vertebrates

  • A. E. Romero-Herrera
  • H. Lehmann
  • K. A. Joysey
  • A. E. Friday
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (volume 62)

Abstract

We have previously (Romero-Herrera et al., 1973) sought to combine evidence from the myoglobin sequences of 18 mammals with a phylogenetic pattern based on zoological evidence. By minimizing the number of mutations, we constructed a cladogram showing the possible Molecular evolution of myoglobin and generated a hypothetical myoglobin chain for a mammalian common ancestor. We proposed that the term “average” rate is more appropriate than “constant” rate, in the context of Molecular evolution. Our phylogenetic pattern was based on the fossil record, and when the available evidence did not resolve the sequence of successive dichotomies the branching points were superimposed and shown as a trichotomy. The evidence from myoglobin resolved these trichotomies in a pattern that would be acceptable to comparative anatomists.

Keywords

Common Ancestor Fossil Record Squirrel Monkey Common Ancestry Single Point Mutation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. E. Romero-Herrera
    • 1
  • H. Lehmann
    • 1
  • K. A. Joysey
    • 2
  • A. E. Friday
    • 2
  1. 1.University Department of Clinical BiochemistryAddenbrooke’s HospitalCambridgeEngland
  2. 2.University Museum of ZoologyCambridgeEngland

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