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Structure and Function of Baboon Hemoglobins

  • Bolling Sullivan
  • Joseph Bonaventura
  • Celia Bonaventura
  • Peter E. Nute
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (volume 62)

Abstract

This chapter details some preliminary findings concerning the structural and functional properties of hemoglobin from the olive baboon, Papio cynocephalus (= anubis). Although the amino acid sequence characterizations are not com-plete, nevertheless they do locate many of the presumed interchanges and even at this stage may possibly contribute to our understanding of human and primate hemoglobins.

Keywords

Oxygen Affinity Oxygen Dissociation Olive Baboon Papio Cynocephalus Sodium Hydrosulfite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bolling Sullivan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joseph Bonaventura
    • 1
    • 2
  • Celia Bonaventura
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter E. Nute
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryDuke University Medical CenterBeaufortUSA
  2. 2.Duke University Marine LaboratoryBeaufortUSA
  3. 3.Regional Primate Research Center and Department of AnthropologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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