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A Multiresolution Hierarchical Approach to Image Segmentation Based on Intensity Extrema

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Abstract

An image as it is stored by a computer is just a multi-dimensional array of pixel values. Although we as humans may look at the displayed image and recognize it as meaningful, the computer must algorithmically analyze the array of pixel values before it can reach any conclusions about the content of the image.

Keywords

  • Original Image
  • Image Segmentation
  • Dark Spot
  • Resolution Level
  • Morse Theory

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1988 Springer Science+Business Media New York

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Lifshitz, L.M., Pizer, S.M. (1988). A Multiresolution Hierarchical Approach to Image Segmentation Based on Intensity Extrema. In: de Graaf, C.N., Viergever, M.A. (eds) Information Processing in Medical Imaging. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7263-3_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7263-3_7

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4615-7265-7

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