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The Application of Psychodynamic Principles to Day Treatment

Chapter

Abstract

Psychodynamic principles refer to broad applications of findings gained from psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy of adults and children. In addition, direct observations of infants in families, as well as longitudinal studies of individuals, have immensely expanded the body of psychodynamic knowledge. A Psychiatric Glossary (American Psychiatric Association, 1975, p. 127) offers this definition:

Psychodynamics: The systematized knowledge and theory of human behavior and its motivation, the study of which depends largely upon the functional significance of emotion. Psychodynamics recognizes the role of unconscious motivation in human behavior. It is a predictive science, based on the assumption that a person’s total make-up and probable reactions at any given moment are the product of past interactions between his specific genetic endowment and the environment in which he has lived since conception.

Keywords

Program Model Mental Function Child Psychiatry Standard Edition Transitional Object 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, College of MedicineUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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