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Building a Statewide Program of Mental Health and Special Education Services for Children and Youth

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Abstract

Providing effective and comprehensive mental health services has been recognized as a major goal for the health care system for many decades. Yet serious obstacles persist as deterrents to accomplishment of adequate nationwide mental health services. Large case loads, un-dertrained staff, insufficient time for treatment, lack of comprehensive interdisciplinary staffing, astronomical costs for hospitalization, and shortages of alternative, supportive living environments are some of the major problems embedded in the current mental health delivery system (Hunter & Riger, 1986). In addition, though there may be pockets of effective mental health programs in some urban communities, critical shortages of programs and skilled personnel exist in rural communities.

Keywords

Mental Health Special Education Community Mental Health Mental Health Program Special Education Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational AdministrationUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.AthensUSA
  3. 3.Exceptional Students DivisionGeorgia Department of EducationAtlantaUSA

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