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An Annotated Bibliography of Publications on the Day Treatment of Children with Emotional Disorders

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Abstract

The following listing and description of publications on the day treatment of emotionally disturbed preschool- and preadolescent-age children was meant to be as complete as possible. As a result, the many publications included represent a history of the place of this treatment modality in the United States as well as in several other countries. Thus, there was no attempt to critically evaluate papers for inclusion by a predetermined set of criteria other than the age of the children beine served.

Keywords

Treatment Program Child Welfare Adolescent Psychiatry Child Psychiatry Annotate Bibliography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Day Care Center, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA

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