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Coffee pp 230-250 | Cite as

Green Coffee Processing

Chapter

Abstract

Following harvesting, green coffee is prepared from the cherries (or berries) of the coffee tree by a relatively complex series of process steps carried out entirely within the producing countries. Technically, the basic problem to be overcome is to take out the coffee seeds from within the cherry, by removing the various covering layers (see Figure 10.1) in the most efficacious manner; and to provide the coffee as far as possible as marketable green coffee beans, with a moisture content of less than 12–13 per cent. Two main processes have been used for many years, if not centuries, traditionally distinguished as the dry process and the wet process, which differ fundamentally in their approach. Apart from differentiation by species and geographical origin, green coffee prepared by these processes is known as either dry process (‘natural’) or wet process (‘washed’) coffee. In addition, certain cleaning and polishing processes may be additionally adopted, together with various grading and sorting techniques to provide the finished coffees by specification for export.

Keywords

Chlorogenic Acid Coffee Bean Green Bean International Colloquium Green Coffee 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© M.N. Clifford and K.C. Willson 1985

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