Skip to main content

Introduction to a Complex Problem

  • Chapter
  • 414 Accesses

Abstract

The historical, esthetic, and economic importance of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) to the Pacific Northwest is well appreciated. However, other aspects of salmon are equally important and possibly are becoming more important as the 21st century approaches. These aspects are the central roles that salmon play in maintaining the biological and cultural integrity of the region. Salmon are biologically important because they are a dominant component of the fish fauna of most Pacific Northwest water bodies. Their feeding habits, reproductive activities, and life-history strategies strongly influence the structure and dynamics of aquatic communities through predation, habitat modification, and nutrient movements. In turn, their role as prey for other vertebrates is central in maintaining biologically diverse and productive communities in the aquatic and associated riparian ecosystems (Naiman et al. 1992). Culturally, they are a symbol of the region’s unique richness of resources and traditions that is recognized by indigenous and non-indigenous peoples alike (Schoonmaker and von Hagen 1996).

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4615-6375-4_2
  • Chapter length: 4 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   189.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-1-4615-6375-4
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   249.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   299.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Referecnes

  • Cooperrider, A. 1991. Reintegrating humans and nature, p. 140–148. In E. Hudson (ed.), Landscape Linkages and Biodiversity. Defenders of Wildlife. Island Press, Washington, DC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Forest Ecosystem Management Assessment Team. 1993. Forest ecosystem management: an ecological, economic, and social assessment. Report of the Forest Ecosystem Management Assessment Team. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gore, A. 1992. Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit. Houghton Mifflin Company, New York.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ludwig, D., R. Hilborn, and C. Walters. 1993. Uncertainty, resource exploitation and conservation: lessons from history. Science 260: 17, 36.

    Google Scholar 

  • McIntosh, B.A., J.R. Sedell, J.E. Smith, R.C. Wissmar, S.E. Clarke, G.H. Reeves, and L.A. Brown. 1994. Historical changes in fish habitat for select river basins of eastern Oregon and Washington. Northwest Science 68: 268–285.

    Google Scholar 

  • Meffe, G.K. 1992. Techno-arrogance and halfway technologies: salmon hatcheries on the Pacific coast of North America. Conservation Biology 6: 350–354.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Naiman, R.J. (ed.). 1992. Watershed Management: Balancing Sustainability and Environmental Change. Springer-Verlag, New York.

    Google Scholar 

  • Naiman, R.J., T.J. Beechie, L.E. Benda, D.R. Berg, P. A. Bisson, L.H. MacDonald, M. D. O’Connor, P. L. Olson, and E.A. Steel. 1992. Fundamental elements of ecologically healthy watersheds in the Pacific Northwest coastal ecoregion, p. 127–188. In R.J. Naiman (ed.), Watershed Management: Balancing Sustainability and Environmental Change. Springer-Verlag, New York.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nehlsen, W., J.E. Williams, and J.A. Lichatowich. 1991. Pacific salmon at the crossroads: stocks at risk from California, Oregon, Idaho and Washington. Fisheries 16(2): 4–21.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Northwest Power Planning Council 1992. Strategy for Salmon, Volume I. Portland, Oregon.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reid, W.V. 1992. The United States needs a national biodiversity policy, p. 4. In World Resources Institute, Issues, and Ideas. World Resources Institute, New York and Washington, DC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schoonmaker, P., and B. von Hagen, eds. 1996. Environment and People of the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. Island Press, Washington, DC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tobin, R. 1990. The Expendable Future: US Politics and the Protection of Biological Diversity. Duke University Press, Durham, North Carolina.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, E.O. 1992. The Diversity of Life. The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wissmar, R.C., J.E. Smith, B.A. McIntosh, H.W. Li, G.H. Reeves, and J.R. Sedell. 1994. A history of resource use and disturbance in riverine basins of eastern Oregon and Washington. Northwest Science 68: 233–267.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wood, C.A. 1993. Implementation and evaluation of the water budget. Fisheries 18: 6–16.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 1997 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Smitch, C. (1997). Introduction to a Complex Problem. In: Stouder, D.J., Bisson, P.A., Naiman, R.J. (eds) Pacific Salmon & their Ecosystems. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-6375-4_2

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-6375-4_2

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4613-7928-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4615-6375-4

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive