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Introduction

  • Martial Hebert
  • Charles E. Thorpe
  • Anthony Stentz
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 388)

Abstract

Robotics ground vehicles have come of age. Over the past decade, they have gone from being laboratory curiosities to functional machines, with applications in military reconnaissance, automated machines for agriculture, mining and construction equipment, and automation equipment for personal cars.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Path Planning Obstacle Avoidance Goal Point Laser Range Finder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martial Hebert
  • Charles E. Thorpe
  • Anthony Stentz

There are no affiliations available

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