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An Empirical Test of the Bodyguard Hypothesis

  • Margo Wilson
  • Sarah L. Mesnick
Chapter

Abstract

In a comparative review of mateship alliances, Mesnick (this volume) argues that one benefit to females of forming a heterosexual pair-bond is reduction in risk of sexual aggression from other males. Several subsidiary hypotheses follow from this “bodyguard hypothesis,” including (1) that females may be especially attracted to large and/or dominant males where high risk of sexual aggression prevails, and (2) that the cross-species distribution of pair-bonding by females may be accounted for, in part, by variable risks of sexual aggression. Mesnick’s review of field studies of a diverse array of species lends much support to these and related hypotheses.

Keywords

Sexual Assault Sexual Harassment Married Woman Sexual Victimization Unmarried Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margo Wilson
  • Sarah L. Mesnick

There are no affiliations available

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