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Histone Gene Expression and Chromatin Structure during Spermatogenesis

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The Fate of the Male Germ Cell

Part of the book series: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology ((AEMB,volume 424))

Summary

The chromatin of male germ cells is restructured throughout spermatogenesis. Analysis of differential histone protein patterns at specific stages of spermatogenesis may contribute towards an understanding of the changes in chromatin structure and function during this differentiation process. The most striking changes in histone patterns occur at the stage of pachytene spermatocytes when most of the linker H1 histones are replaced by the testis specific subtype H1t. In addition, replacement of core histone subtypes is observed at this stage. These structural changes precede the reorganization of chromatin at haploid stages when histones are replaced first by transition proteins and then by protamines

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Doenecke, D. et al. (1997). Histone Gene Expression and Chromatin Structure during Spermatogenesis. In: Ivell, R., Holstein, AF. (eds) The Fate of the Male Germ Cell. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol 424. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-5913-9_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-5913-9_4

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