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Altered Fractionation: Radiobiological Principles, Clinical Results, and Potential for Dose Escalation

  • Howard D. Thames
  • K. Kian Ang
Chapter
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 93)

Abstract

Simply put, fractionation is the time distribution of a radiation dose. The specification of a fractionation regimen is the same as defining the mathematical function f(t), where the values f give the dose rate at time t. For single doses f(t) is zero, except for the time period of dose delivery, during which it is small or large, depending on the dose rate; if the dose is fractionated, then fis zero and nonzero at sequential intervals.

Keywords

Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy Concomitant Boost Altered Fractionation Repair Kinetic Accelerate Fractionation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard D. Thames
  • K. Kian Ang

There are no affiliations available

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