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Modeling to Predict Biodegradability

Applications in Risk Assessment and Chemical Design
  • Robert S. Boethling
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 54)

Abstract

In the US, the safety of specific chemical substances is evaluated primarily under three statutes. Substances used as food additives, drugs and cosmetics are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). Chemical substances proposed for use as pesticides are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), which imposes a host of data requirements for any submitter seeking to register the substance as an active ingredient. Industrial chemicals are regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA; Public Law 94–469), which was enacted by Congress in 1976 in response to a perceived need to limit exposure to “environmental chemicals” such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). As stated in the Act, its primary purpose is “to assure that…innovation and commerce in…chemical substances and mixtures do not present an unreasonable risk of injury to health or the environment” (TSCA, section 2(b)). TSCA requirements are different for existing substances and substances not yet in production (“new” chemicals). One of the first tasks of the newly created Office of Toxic Substances (now the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics; OPPT) was to assemble and publish a list of chemical substances already in commerce. This was accomplished in July, 1979 as the TSCA Chemical Substance Inventory, which listed approximately 50,000 substances then in production or being imported into the US. Since that time the Inventory has grown to include over 70,000 substances by the addition of new chemicals.

Keywords

Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Diphenyl Phosphate Surfactant Science Series Unreasonable Risk Branch Alkyl Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert S. Boethling
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyOffice of Pollution Prevention and Toxics 7406USA

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